University of Missouri

People

Paleontology Faculty

  • John Huntley
  • John Huntley
  • Assistant Professor
  • 573.884.8083
  • huntleyj@missouri.edu
  • CV
  • Dr. Huntley is broadly interested in the fossil record of biotic interactions (including parasitism, predation, and competition), stratigraphic paleobiology, conservation paleobiology, and the evolution of morphological disparity.  He completed a BS in Geology at Appalachian State University, a MS in Geology at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (Advisor: Patricia Kelley), and a PhD in Geosciences at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Advisor: Michał Kowalewski).  Following a one-year postdoctoral assignment at Virginia Tech he spent one year as Lecturer at the University of Kentucky, two years as a Humboldt Research Fellow at the GeoZentrum Nordbayern in Erlangen (Germany), and two years as Visiting Assistant Professor at St. Lawrence University.  Dr. Huntley joined the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Missouri in 2013 as an Assistant Professor.  The subjects of Dr. Huntley’s research span invertebrates and protists from the marine, freshwater, and terrestrial realms ranging in age from Paleoproterozoic to Anthropocene.  His current favorites are modern bivalves (especially when pasta, olive oil, and wine are involved).

  • James Schiffbauer
  • James Schiffbauer
  • Assistant Professor
  • 573.882.9501
  • schiffbauerj@missouri.edu
  • Specializing in taphonomy, biogeochemistry, and paleobiology of Konservat Lagerstätten, Dr. Schiffbauer studies pathways of exceptional preservation, largely focused at the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition during the­ dawn of animal life. Jim received his Honors BA in Biology from West Virginia University (2000), dual MS degrees in Marine Biology and Coastal Ecosystems from Nova Southeastern University (2004; advisor: Patricia Blackwelder), and a PhD in Geobiology from Virginia Tech (2009; advisor: Shuhai Xiao). Following a two-year post-doctoral position in the Virginia Tech Department of Geosciences, he spent a year as an Assistant Research Professor at the Virginia Tech Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Nanoscale Characterization and Fabrication Laboratory and an Adjunct Professor in the Virginia Tech Department of Geosciences, studying advanced microbeam analytical methods in geosciences. Jim joined the Mizzou Department of Geological Sciences in 2012. He is broadly interested in the evolution and ecology of our earliest animal ancestors, and the geobiological and environmental factors that influence soft-tissue fossil preservation.

Affiliated Faculty

  • Kevin Shelton
  • Kevin Shelton
  • Professor
  • SheltonKL@missouri.edu
  • Dr. Shelton applies stable isotope geochemistry to a wide variety of problems, many of which involve sedimentology and diagenesis of Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Kevin received his BA in Geology and BS in Mineralogy cum laude from Miami University (Ohio), where he developed a love of collecting fossils in the well-preserved Ordovician sections near the Cincinnati Arch. He received MS, MPhil and PhD degrees in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University, studying ore-bearing Devonian carbonates of the Gaspe Peninsula of Quebec. Kevin’s interests are eclectic and over the years have ranged from studies of Cretaceous ammonoids to gold formation in Archean greenstone belts. With the recent arrivals of Jim Schiffbauer and John Huntley at MU, he has rekindled a decades-long fascination with the Upper Cambrian rocks of Missouri. Together they hoped to understand the global and local contributions to carbon isotope signals preserved in these rocks in order to determine what effects the processes leading to C isotope variability had on biota.

Graduate Students

  • Jesse Broce
  • Jesse Broce
  • PhD Student
  • jsbvf6@mail.missouri.edu
  • Jesse joined Dr. Schiffbauer's lab and the Mizzou Paleobiology Group as a Ph.D. student and Huggins Fellow in 2013. He recieved a B.S. from University of Idaho and a M.S. from Virginia Tech, where his master's thesis consisted of taphonomic studies of Cambrian phosphatized embryos. Here at Missouri, he continues his work in taphonomy, using experimental and analytical techniques to untangle the complexities of Burgess Shale-type soft-tissue preservation, especially in vermiform fossils.

  • Page Quinton
  • Page Quinton
  • PhD Student
  • pcq6y5@mail.missouri.edu
  • Page joined the Mizzou Paleobiology Group in 2010 and completed her MS in 2012. She is currently working on her Ph.D. with Dr. MacLeod. Her research focuses on the use of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes to address questions about the Ordovician climate with implications for the role of climate change in the Late Ordovician mass extinction event.

  • Tara Selly
  • Tara Selly
  • PhD Student
  • tlsvzb@mail.missouri.edu
  • Tara completed her BA in Geology and Biology from Gustavus Adolphus College before joining the Mizzou Paleobiology Group as an MS student working with Dr. Schiffbauer. Her research focuses on experimental and actualistic taphonomy. Currently she is researching preservational pathways of the Cambrian predator Anomalocaris from the House Range, Utah. Tara enjoys being outdoors and fishing. When she can not be outside, she entertains herself by watching bad sci-fi movies.